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RSM, 2021-22
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13 unwanted firearms given up at Arlington police buyback

Peter J. Koutoujian, sheriff

UPDATED,  Oct. 7: The Arlington Police Department received 13 unwanted firearms during a “Safer Homes, Safer Community” gun buyback Oct. 2, at the Winchester Country Club.

The event was held in partnership with the Middlesex Sheriff's Office, Winchester Police Department, Arlington Human Rights Commission and local faith-based organizations.

Of the 13 firearms, nine were handguns which included .22-caliber and 9mm pistols, two .40-caliber Glock pistols and multiple revolvers. Two rifles and two shotguns were also received. Each firearm will now be safely and responsibly destroyed by the Massachusetts State Police, an Oct. 7 news release from Arlington police said.

The firearms were taken back with no questions asked, and the former owners were given a gift card. Faith leaders throughout the community raised funds for the buyback event.A total of 13 unwanted firearms were taken in by the Arlington Police Department during a “Safer Homes, Safer Community” gun buyback event on Saturday, Oct. 2 at the Winchester Country Club. (Photo courtesy Arlington Police Department)The 13 unwanted firearms were taken in Oct. 2. / Arlington Police Department photo

Arlington police and the sheriff's office have partnered together four times to host gun buybacks since 2013, with 144 total unwanted firearms turned in over the course of the events. APD's gun-buyback initiative is usually hosted every three years, but was held out of the department's regular three-year rotation this year in acknowledgement of the Human Rights Commission's recognition of September as Gun Safety Month.

Gun-buyback programs represent an opportunity for residents to safely dispose of firearms that are no longer used, needed or wanted. Turning in unwanted firearms helps to prevent tragedy and violence by ensuring they do not fall into the wrong hands.

"Gun buyback initiatives help to keep our community safe by ensuring these unwanted firearms will never be used to harm anyone," Chief Juliann Flaherty said in the release.

"We would like to thank the many donors who contributed to a successful event, including the Calvary Church, Mission and Justice Ministry of the Park Avenue Congregational Church, Ellenhorn, Devito Funeral Home and a generous individual named Carolyn Manson. We would also like to thank our law enforcement and community partners who assisted in coordinating the event, as well as those who volunteered."

Added Capt. Sean Kiernan, "We would additionally like to thank the Winchester Country Club for allowing the use of their tennis court parking lot for the event. The general manager and staff of the country club, including guests at the country club, were more than accommodating to officers and volunteers. This event is a team effort and relationships built with community members and surrounding communities allowed this event to be successful."


May-July 2019: Buyback draws 120 unwanted guns (one was loaded)

Photos of returned firearms in 2019


This announcement was published Friday, Sept. 10, 2021. It was updated Oct. 7 by a news release by Leah Comins, who works for John Guilfoil Public Relations.

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